Forthcoming

What follows are a few books I hope and expect to read in 2013. Insha’allah* this list will grow. 

January

silenceThe Silence and the Roar, Nihad Sirees, trans. Max Weiss – Pushkin Press (UK Release)

Sirees’s book is a remarkable fictional achievement. It tracks a day in the life of a writer in a setting that is crisply and clearly Syrian, and yet also  touches the many other “silences” and “roars” that exist in our world(s).

February

41nxCtcXf0L._AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-44,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_That Smell & Notes from Prison, Sonallah Ibrahim, trans. Robyn Creswell – New Directions

Originally trans. Denys Johnson-Davies but long out of print, That Smell (or The Smell of It), is here re-translated by Robyn Creswell. Composed during and in the wake of Ibrahim’s five-year prison sentence, the semi-autobiographical story follows a recently released political prisoner as he wanders through Cairo. Creswell has also included an annotated selection of Notes from Prison culled from Ibrahim’s prison diary. A must-have. Plus, if you haven’t gotten a copy of Stealth yet, you must find a way to get that as well.

june_rainJune Rain, Jabbour Douaihy, trans. Paula Haydar – BQFP

Shortlisted for the inaugural International Prize for Arabic Fiction, Douaihy’s June Rain centers on an armed dispute in and around a Lebanese village church that left 24 dead. It evokes the sectarian fissures and fractures in Douaihy’s poetic prose. A review of the French translation concluded: “Despite its length and a denouement that leaves one unsatisfied, June Rain is a novel which one can not fail to recommend.”

Emoz, Eslam Mosbah, trans. Raphael Cohen – AUC Press

March

USThe Silence and the Roar, Nihad Sirees, trans. Max Weiss – Other Press (US release)

Same reasons as above, new country. And new jacket.

The Arch and the Butterfly, Mohammed Achaari, trans. Aida Bamia – BQFP

510KbbhoeiL._SL500_AA300_This novel was co-winner of the 2011 International Prize for Arabic Fiction, and is foregrounded by the life of a left-wing Moroccan writer, Yousef, whose past life, political beliefs and faith in his own principles are shaken by a letter he receives one day about his son Yassin. The anonymous letter tells his father that the son “died as a martyr in Afghanistan,” and forces Yousef to re-examine his life.

horses-of-god-cs-apr_1Horses of God, Mahi Binebine, trans. Lulu Norman (from the French) - Tin House Books

Also by a Moroccan author, this novel takes as its subject the violence of May 16, 2003, when fourteen suicide bombers launched a series of attacks throughout Casablanca, and is narrated from the afterlife. You might read them together.

April

Traces, Gamal al-Ghitani, trans. ?? – BQFP

May

9789992179161Where Pigeons Don’t FlyYousef al-Mohaimeed, trans. Robin Moger – BQFP

This is the third of al-Mohaimeed’s novels to be translated into English (Wolves of the Crescent Moon, Munira’s Bottle). Neither of those were mind-blowing, but they did show narrative promise. This book follows Fahd, a boy growing up in Riyadh, from early childhood to the point where he flees Saudi Arabia to Britain.

June

51nDzsx2BhL._SL500_AA300_Where the Rain Doesn’t Fall / Land of No Rain, Amjad Nasser, trans. Jonathan Wright, BQFP

The first novel of an acclaimed poet, the book takes place in Hamiya, a fictional Arab country run by military commanders who treat power as a personal possession to be handed down from one generation to the next, which could be…lots of places. Highly recommended by Ahdaf Soueif, among others.

51iRtV1sCCL._SL500_AA300_The Mehlis Report, Rabee Jaber, trans. Kareem James Abu Zaid, New Directions

Testimony from translator Kareem James Abu Zaid: “I don’t remember laughing very much the first time I read the novel, but now that I’m translating it, I often find myself laughing out loud – one of my fellow translators here at the Banff residency who has occasionally shared a library desk with me here at Banff can attest to this! The humor is very dark, but it’s there. I think this must be one of the reasons I was so attracted to the novel in the first place – I’ve always been a fan of black humor[.]” (More.)

JULY

9780300190601The Corpse WasherSinan Antoon, trans. the author, Yale University Press

This compelling novel by Antoon follows  Jawad, born to a traditional Shi’ite family of corpse washers and shrouders in Baghdad, as he — an artist by inclination and training — returns to the family business after the onrush of corpses following the 2003 invasion. Antoon is also a poet and the award-winning translator of Mahmoud Darwish, among other authors, and has a deft hand with both languages.

UNKNOWN RELEASE, 2013

The Sultan’s Seal, Youssef Rakha, trans. Paul Starkey – Clockroot Books

The Dove’s Necklace, Raja Alem, trans. Katharine Halls and Adam Talib – Overlook and Duckworth

The House of el-Deeb, Ezzat el-Kamhawi – AUC Press (Winner of the 2012 Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature.)

Fingers of Dates, Muhsin al-Ramly, trans. Luke Leafgren – isa AUC Press

The Lady from Tel Aviv, Rabai al-Madhoun, trans. Elliott Colla –  Saqi/Telegram

Also, Ghazi Gheblawi (@Gheblawi) tells me these three will be coming from DARF publishers, the English imprint of Ferjani Books:

Maps of the Soul, Ahmed Fagih

African Titanics, Abubaker Hamed Kahal

Chewing Gum, Mansour Bushnaf

#

I leave “insha’allah” or isa in the text, vs. translating it as “God willing” or “let’s hope” or “GW,” because I mean none of those things. I mean…insha’allah.

11 replies

  1. Any tips for my prose?

  2. I would like that you send me a sample of book at my address:p.o.box:10132, libreville(gabon).Please send it rapidly,i’m real passionnate by the arabic literature.

  3. Hello, I am an English teacher at a Secondary International School in Cairo. I would really like to invite an Arabic author to speak to our students during the week of 23-27th January. We will be willing to pay a fee. Please let me know if you have any contacts or if you can recommend anyone. If you are able to come and explain the current status of Arabic literature and translation, that would also be fantastic. I look forward to hearing from you as soon as possible. Thank you, Virginia

    • Virginia, I tried to reply to the email you posted with your comment, but it bounced back. Please send me a note at mlynxqualey – at – gmail.com if you see this. M.

  4. Include me on your e-mail list.

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